Rep. Lloyd Arnold (R-Boonville) will leave his southern Indiana seat to become the new head of law enforcement at the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced the appointment Wednesday. Arnold replaces Danny East, who left DNR last month.

The Republican lawmaker previously served in the U.S. Army, the Indiana National Guard, and as a reserve sheriff’s deputy. He also worked for Toyota in Princeton and for the Orange County Economic Development Partnership.

State lawmakers Wednesday heard a lot of support and a few fears about the local impacts of short-term housing rentals through platforms such as Airbnb.

Commerce and Economic Development Study Committee members say they want any future regulations on the issue to protect property rights – for both hosts and their neighbors.

Children at the East Chicago Urban Enterprise Academy school learned how to test air, water, and soil samples for lead Tuesday with help from the NAACP.

The school sits right across the street from the USS Lead Superfund site, a federal toxic waste clean-up site contaminated with lead and arsenic.

Principal Veronica Eskew says the lead testing let her students take ownership over how lead poisoning affects them.

Indiana is partway into a record-setting cash crop harvest – but months of uneven weather conditions have put some farmers behind.

The state’s soybean crop is 42 percent harvested as of this week, about the same as average. But the corn crop lags at just 24 percent.

Purdue University agronomist Bob Nielsen says wet weather earlier this year forced some farmers to plant late or replant their crops, and cool August temperatures lengthened the growing season.

Members of a State Board of Education committee tasked with proposing new ways for students to qualify for graduation began sketching their plan Tuesday.

There’s still a lot for the dozen-plus members to sort out before their last meeting next month.

But a list of nine alternative ways students could become eligible for a diploma has begun to take shape. It includes: earning industry-recognized credentials; passing the military entrance exam plus enlisting; and work-based learning with job experience.

Barbara Brosher / IPBS

 

The Trump administration’s new rules on birth control coverage open the door for the University of Notre Dame and other employers to stop covering contraceptives as part of their health plans. A legal battle over the changes is already brewing.

University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins is applauding the policy change, saying in a statement it reinforces religious freedom.

 

A key Indiana state lawmaker wants to dramatically increase penalties for certain drug and gun crimes.

The General Assembly rewrote its criminal code in recent years. Its aim was to drive more nonviolent, mostly drug offenders out of the prison system and into local treatment programs. And part of that was by giving judges more discretion in sentencing – to be able to decide what’s best for an individual offender.

Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) wants to undo some of that.

Matt Dine

"What happens when a fearless improviser, already a top virtuoso in the city that dominates the music world, trades his piano keyboard for a blank orchestral score?" It's the question Orpheus Chamber Orchestra is asking for their program, From Pen to Piano, this Sunday at Loeb Playhouse on the Purdue University campus. WBAA's John Clare spoke to two members of the group, violinist Renée Jolles, and bassoonist Gina Cuffari about the program and touring.

HPV Vaccine Part Of Plan To Reduce Cancer Deaths

Oct 9, 2017

There’s a strategic planning effort underway at the Indiana State Department of Health to reduce the number of cervical cancer deaths. It’s prompted by legislation from the 2017 session. The plan includes a push to increase the number of young people who get the human papillomavirus vaccine.

HPV is the single greatest risk factor for cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine can help prevent that cancer but ISDH cancer control director Keylee Wright says less than half of all youth were vaccinated in 2016.

EPA Moves To Repeal Clean Power Plan

Oct 9, 2017

Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt announced Monday the Trump administration will repeal the Clean Power Plan.

The Clean Power Plan would reduce carbon emissions from power plants by 30 percent nationwide in an effort to slow man-made climate change.

Indiana and 27 other states previously sued the EPA over the Obama-era rule.

The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the rule from going into effect in 2016, a move that met the approval of industry groups such as the Indiana Coal Council.

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What's New: Classical Goes Pop

We’re featuring some covers and popular music with classical groups on this episode. While often associated with early rock and roll music, Jukeboxes and their popularity extends back much earlier, including swing, opera, and classical music ! We’ll hear popular selections from David Bowie, the Beatles , and talk with Jethro Tull flutist Ian Anderson on today’s What’s New .

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Ask The Mayor: Crawfordsville's Todd Barton On Seeing Video Of A Movie Shooting

There aren’t that many movies staged and shot in Crawfordsville. And probably only a small subset of those involve replica firearms. So when a Crawfordsville police officer encountered what looked like a robbery earlier this week and fired a bullet at an actor carrying an air gun, people began to formulate questions.

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How To Stream WBAA From Windows 10

Make sure your PC chooses a different program than Windows Groove (like Windows Media Player)

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Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

The pushback — and the outrage — began immediately.

Trump was asked on Monday why he had not yet commented on the deaths of four U.S. soldiers who were ambushed during a mission in Niger on Oct. 4. In his answer, Trump turned attention to the policies of past presidents and their contact with families of service members who have died.

On Tuesday, he followed his initial comments with more assertions, offering a specific example. That prompted further rebuttal from staff of previous administrations.

When negotiators for the United States, Canada and Mexico wrapped up the latest round of trade talks in Washington on Tuesday, they sounded frustrated — and far apart.

From cars to cows, they have big disagreements over how the North American Free Trade Agreement should work. In fact, the disputes appear so big, they may be threatening the future of NAFTA.

So officials have agreed to delay their next meeting — pushing off its start in Mexico City until Nov. 17; they originally had planned to meet later this month.

On Wednesday morning, a federal judge in Manhattan will hear preliminary arguments in a case that claims President Trump is violating the Constitution's ban on accepting foreign payments, or emoluments.

Less than a week after President Trump said he is cutting off subsidies to health insurance companies, lawmakers say they have a deal to restore the money and take other actions that could stabilize insurance markets for next year.

American author George Saunders has won the Man Booker prize for his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, a polyphonous meditation on death, grief and American history.

Saunders, widely lauded for his short stories, was considered the favorite to win the award. His novel centers on the death of Abraham Lincoln's beloved son Willie, and the night that Lincoln reportedly spent in the graveyard, devastated by his grief and lingering by his son's body.

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