Indiana’s proposed federal education plan has been published online and it is now in the hands of Gov. Eric Holcomb.

Indiana is required to submit a new federal education plan this year as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the No Child Left Behind law in 2015.

READ MORE: Indiana Plan Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

The plan includes the state’s academic standards, how students will be tested on those standards and plans to help to failing schools.

After operating for four years without a full-time leader, Indiana’s children’s commission finally has an executive director.

The Commission on Improving the Status of Children in Indiana was established in 2013, but has never had a person whose entire job was dedicated to the commission.

Julie Whitman leaves the Indiana Youth Institute to become the executive director of the commission.

Indiana school districts with 2,000 or fewer students lag behind academically as compared to larger corporations, according to a study commissioned by the Indiana Chamber and released Tuesday.

The report, conducted by researchers at Ball State University, found that the enrollment size of a school corporation correlates with student test scores and access to college prep courses.

A new partnership aims to provide members of the Indiana National Guard with mental health and substance abuse care. Indiana National Guard behavioral health officer Maj. Scott Edwards says the program called “Mission Recovery,” tailored to service member’s needs.

“So when service members come they are meeting with a provider who understands more about the realities of being a military member,” Edwards says. “That’s hugely important for us and it’s key to the success in any kind of initiative where people come to get help for mental health or substance abuse problems.”

janinsanfran / www.flickr.com/photos/49399132@N00/

Judges in Montgomery County are trying to establish a public defender office, but the lawyers currently serving in that capacity say it may be too costly.

The judges presented the proposal amid an overload of cases that require court-assigned attorneys. The county currently contracts private lawyers to fill those positions.

Justin Froedge is one of the county’s acting public defenders. He says a cheaper alternative may be to keep the existing system in place and give contracted lawyers a pay bump.

When you drive over a pothole in your neighborhood, you can report it to the city and hope they come fix it soon – or you can fix it yourself. At least, that’s what one Indianapolis man has been doing this year.

Michael Warren’s project, which he calls Open Source roads, reveals a lot about the different ways residents and governments try to care for their communities.

City of Frankfort

A severe burn to one of his arms has required medical care for Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes.

“It was a nasty burn," says city Human Resouces Director Jack Dodd. "And so he received treatment down in Indianapolis and it required an overnight stay in the hospital. So he underwent some surgery and is doing well.”

Dodd declined to say how the mayor burned his arm, but did say McBarnes is expected to return to the office within a few days.

An Indiana hate crimes law may become reality next year after House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) endorsed the idea in the wake of white supremacist violence in Virginia last weekend.

Gov. Eric Holcomb called the events in Charlottesville – in which a woman was killed when a car allegedly driven by a white supremacist protester plowed into a crowd of counter protesters – “sickening.”

Indiana says it wants to help train train more Hoosier workers for in-demand jobs. Two grant programs will help cover tuition for career certificates and training costs for employers in what the state calls “high-demand” areas.

The legislature approved $10 million apiece over two years for the two programs – the Workforce Ready Grant and the Employer Training Grant.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A group of about 50 City of West Lafayette employees, all clad in blue tee shirts, flanked the city’s redesigned State Street Monday, welcoming Purdue students back to campus. WBAA’s Stan Jastrzebski walked along with Mayor John Dennis and City Clerk Sana Booker and sent an audio postcard.

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Arts & Culture

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WBAA Arts Spotlight: Loving Heart Animal Shelter

John Clare talks to Kati Davis of the Loving Heart Animal Shelter , a no-kill animal shelter and adoption organization. Activities coming up this month include the BOW WOW Film Fest on Sunday, August 6th, and the 2nd Annual Sizzlin' Summer Fest on Saturday, August 19th.

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WBAA Public Affairs

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Ask The Mayor: Crawfordsville's Todd Barton On The Many Types Of Cooperation

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton is focusing a lot these days on fostering cooperation. He’s hosted the first of what he hopes will be a series of meetings with business leaders, he’s brought together multiple parties to complete a long-stalled road project and he’s working with the state on Stellar Communities projects.

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Engagement

Winning Design Announced:

With ten designs to choose from, the favorite was submitted by Brishen Vanderkolk.

News From NPR

In 2011, the National Park Service put in place a policy to encourage national parks to end the sale of bottled water. The aim was to cut back on plastic litter.

It was not actually an outright ban — but 23 out of 417 national parks, including Grand Canyon National Park and Zion National Park, implemented restrictions on bottled water sales. The parks encourage visitors to use tap water and refillable bottles instead.

Now, The Trump administration has reversed this Obama-era policy.

President Trump's belated and halfhearted denunciation of the hate groups that marched in Charlottesville, Va., has cost him the support of numerous business leaders and fellow Republicans and prompted at least a half-dozen nonprofit organizations to cancel planned fundraising events at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

But Trump's religious advisers, who might be expected to offer moral guidance, have been almost entirely silent. None of the 25 members of his "Evangelical Advisory Board" has resigned in protest or even offered public criticism of his Charlottesvile comments.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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